rookiemag:

holy heck Mitski 4ever and ever and ever and ever and EVER 

xoxo

allyssa

"All the more pity he didn’t trust his subjects (or viewers) enough to leave his photos completely unidentified and have the viewer freely explore the images for content (which, unfortunately for some, might lead to "spot the tranny" but at least it would be entirely viewer driven). Mostly, White and the reviewers I’ve mentioned never really refer to the adult women in the images as women, rather continuing White’s preference for displaying them as transgender specimens. White is all about involving the viewer in his own process as creep-a-zoid and voyeur. Making us just as dirty, despite his clean gridded background and bright lighting. Like Maury’s show, you know it’s all about spotting "trangenders" from the get-go, so it’s really no longer any kind of undirected experience."

Skip the Makeup: Charlie White and Maury’s Big Reveal

Charlie White’s Teen and Transgender Comparative Studies came up as a “popular post” suggestion for me while browsing featureshoot. It’s a fairly old feature, with the source material and this criticism being even older.  I was surprised most of the articles I looked up didn’t mention most of the points in this critique.  Even an essay presented at the annual meeting of the National Women’s Studies Association (because White doesn’t want to deconstruct passing, I guess that means the writer doesn’t have to either) glosses over these points. Some of the articles referenced in this critique were edited (I’m assuming in response to it), especially the morning news post that is the source of the subsequent features online.

Maybe I’ll make a dummy zine off of my hp laserjet and stare at it until I think it’s worth a single penny.  Sorry, a single 1/3 penny, gotta remember my conversion rates.

Vicki // Guest Mattress

Frieda and I

Frieda and I

Mom with hair dye.
2012

Mom with hair dye.

2012

Moved to Warsaw y’all.

Moved to Warsaw y’all.

madisonocarroll:

l-oeil-ailleurs:

INTRODUCING MADISON CARROLL 

I’m from a suburb outside of Philadelphia. It’s a very affluent, self-contained area and the atmosphere of the place rarely incites its general population to meaningfully question their own perspectives or responsibilities. For this reason it is idyllic for some people but in reality it is very dystopian. I currently live in Philadelphia. I’m 21 years old. I became interested in photography when I was 18. I used (and still use) the Canon Rebel that my mom had used to take family pictures when I was growing up. I had always liked looking at pictures, but later in High School I dated a boy who was very passionate about music, and at the time I felt as though I needed to throw myself into something the same way. That’s initially why I started taking my own pictures. I don’t have a specific goal or message in mind that I’m trying to achieve or convey. I’m most interested in things like playfulness in colors and patterns, some humor and perversity. For the most part photography now dictates where I live and how I think about and see things. Many of the issues we talk about within the practice of photography reflect what’s happening on a wider scale… our consciousness, what we call ethics, political correctness, things like that. So working with photography and the discourse around it makes you think very critically about these things and how we should deal with or confront them. I don’t think I’d be in Philadelphia if it weren’t for photography. This is a picture of an old friend of mine. She struggled with dermatillomania, which had become extremely crippling for her. She’s doing much better now. I love the work of Steven Zak. I like that it’s all over the place and there’s a lot to see. I think you could say a lot about it without ever using a cliche or silly metaphor or trying to solve some imaginary riddle… but it’s also a lot more exciting and powerful than a lot of the banal snapshot-style stuff that is really popular right now. I have a friend who always says that you don’t need to try so hard to interpret poetry, because it’s all on the page and you just have to read what’s there. So to me, Steven’s work is the same way.

the a’s from a little q+a I did with L’oeil Ailleurs

Thanks for the shoutout Madison! You da bomb.

madisonocarroll:

l-oeil-ailleurs:

INTRODUCING MADISON CARROLL
I’m from a suburb outside of Philadelphia. It’s a very affluent, self-contained area and the atmosphere of the place rarely incites its general population to meaningfully question their own perspectives or responsibilities. For this reason it is idyllic for some people but in reality it is very dystopian. I currently live in Philadelphia. I’m 21 years old. I became interested in photography when I was 18. I used (and still use) the Canon Rebel that my mom had used to take family pictures when I was growing up. I had always liked looking at pictures, but later in High School I dated a boy who was very passionate about music, and at the time I felt as though I needed to throw myself into something the same way. That’s initially why I started taking my own pictures. I don’t have a specific goal or message in mind that I’m trying to achieve or convey. I’m most interested in things like playfulness in colors and patterns, some humor and perversity. For the most part photography now dictates where I live and how I think about and see things. Many of the issues we talk about within the practice of photography reflect what’s happening on a wider scale… our consciousness, what we call ethics, political correctness, things like that. So working with photography and the discourse around it makes you think very critically about these things and how we should deal with or confront them. I don’t think I’d be in Philadelphia if it weren’t for photography. This is a picture of an old friend of mine. She struggled with dermatillomania, which had become extremely crippling for her. She’s doing much better now. I love the work of Steven Zak. I like that it’s all over the place and there’s a lot to see. I think you could say a lot about it without ever using a cliche or silly metaphor or trying to solve some imaginary riddle… but it’s also a lot more exciting and powerful than a lot of the banal snapshot-style stuff that is really popular right now. I have a friend who always says that you don’t need to try so hard to interpret poetry, because it’s all on the page and you just have to read what’s there. So to me, Steven’s work is the same way.

the a’s from a little q+a I did with L’oeil Ailleurs

Thanks for the shoutout Madison! You da bomb.